INFOGRAPHIC: CONCUSSION MYTHS

With so much new information coming out every day on  concussions, it's easy to get lost. Here are some of the most common concussion myths, debunked.

CONCUSSION MYTH 1:

Sports concussions, especially concussions in youth sports, are frequently discussed in the media. However, it’s important to keep in mind that a head injury can occur outside of sports too. According to the CDC, falls are the #1 cause of concussions. It’s important to be aware of the risk of a concussion outside of sports, too.

 

CONCUSSION MYTH 2:

It used to be that the main thing athletic coaches would look for as a sign of concussion was loss of consciousness. In fact, concussions without loss of consciousness happen in 9/10 cases. Coaches, parents, and athletes need to be on the lookout for other signs of a concussion, like dizziness, concussion headache, and other more subtle concussion side effects.

 

CONCUSSION MYTH 3:

A frequently misunderstood topic is sleeping after concussion. The question of what happens if you sleep with a concussion seems to scare a lot of people. However, falling asleep with a concussion can often help your brain get needed rest, especially in the first 24-48 hours after the injury. As long as you don’t present danger signs like slurred speech, intense nausea, or increased confusion, you can sleep after a concussion.

 

CONCUSSION MYTH 4:

Concussion and rest have been debated time and time again. The “dark room myth” is unsupported by evidence or expert consensus. In fact, research has shown that concussion recovery time increases when the patient is instructed to avoid all stimulation. Experts agree that the best concussion treatment and return to play protocols involve a gradual and progressive increase in activity.

 

CONCUSSION MYTH 5:

Ten years ago, patients with a concussion diagnosis were told to get used to a new life. They wouldn’t be able to do the same activities and they might have some memory issues. However, there have been advances in concussion treatment. In fact, research shows that only 20% of patients will have a concussion recovery time of longer than three weeks. With the right treatment and rehabilitation, patients can feel back to normal in less than a month.

MAKE SURE YOU'RE PREPARED IN CASE OF A CONCUSSION